Feline Fans | Volume 14 – August 2015: Let’s Talk Cat Grooming

Orange County Veterinary Services: Irvine Vet Services

Who knows more about grooming than us Felines?? Why IVS of course!

Hello fellow felines-

Just two weeks ago my Mom hauled me into IVS for a blood test. Now that I am 14 it was time to check on ‘what’s up’ with my blood and organ systems. (So I have been told once every year).

Turns out that there was overall good news – for an older guy my kidney function looks normal and that’s always a concern for us seniors. But my bloodwork showed that I am now hyperthyroid. According to my Dad this explains why I am so skinny and why my hair coat has turned dull lately and why I am shedding a bit more than normal.

The good news is that I am gaining weight and because my Dad is a Vet (and I am SOOO good at taking pills) I am gaining weight and feeling MUCH better. Treatments for hyperthyroidism include oral medication and radioactive iodine treatment.

So what are the symptoms? Could be increased appetite, weight loss, excessive thirst, and hyperactivity, and for me it was increased shedding.

So-it makes a lot of sense to pay attention to us often ‘silent type’ felines. We ‘talk a lot’ by doing abnormal things so please pay attention!

Do you have excessive shedding in your house? Need to learn about how to groom us cats when we could use some help staying clean and beautiful? Read on! Check out tips from our groomer Julia!

Signing off for now-your friend-

Manny-

The cat Manny pawing around in our OC veterinary offices


How Often Should I Groom My Cat this year?

This is the number one question we are asked from our clients for their pets’ grooming. The answer is not a simple one, because it depends on your cat, how short you like to keep their coat, and they type of coat they have. However, a good rule of thumb is between 4-6 weeks.

In order to accommodate your busy schedules, Irvine Veterinary Services offers grooming and bathing appointments 7 days a week! Each kitty groom and bath comes with a mani/pedi (nail trim) and an ear cleaning. Every time we bathe your pet, we will brush out their coat to keep your pet from matting. You can add on a tooth brushing too for a small fee.

One of the greatest things about grooming your cat at IVS is how hard we try to give you the cut you want. If you bring in photos of how you want your pet to look, we will do our best to accommodate that cut. Our groomer will call you with any questions or feedback they have based on your cat’s breed and coat type. We highly recommend speaking with your groomer on the phone or coming in prior to your appointment if you would like to request anything new or special for your groom. Our groomers are happy to talk to you!

We do recommend at least one bath in-between grooming appointments. More if you like to keep your pet long and fluffy. These baths and brush-outs help to keep your pet from matting, keep their coat healthy, and keep them clean.

Book your bathing or grooming appointment today!
Schedule an Orange County ca grooming appointment


How to Keep your Feline Looking Great In Between Grooms!

By Julia Giron, University Park

In order to keep your feline looking great in-between grooms, I recommend the following steps:

Purchase a Furminator, Zoom Away Loose hair, an undercoat rake, cat shedding comb fine, Slicker Brush depending on your cat’s fur type and a cat flea comb.

Brush your cat at least once a week. If you can, trim their nails and clean their ears gently at this time.

  • Before you begin, make sure your cat is at ease. You want to brush them when it will be enjoyable for them. Offer lots of praise and treats.
  • Begin brushing your cat at his hind legs and continue with the tail.
  • Move to the front of your cat and brush the front legs and the rest of the body.
  • Don’t forget to brush under the arms/legs and under the chin.
  • Using a cotton ball and ear cleaner, wipe out the ears gently. If the ears have a lot of buildup or are red, please schedule an appointment to make sure there is not an infection.
  • Trim your cat’s nails, only the white part, stop before the pink or “quick.” If you cut the quick, your cats nail might bleed. To stop bleeding use Quick Stop. Apply pressure for 10 minutes.
  • Using distilled water gently wipe the corner of your cat’s eyes to remove any discharge.

Did you know long haired cats shed less than short haired cats? Short and medium haired cats shed frequently and might benefit from more frequent brushing. A Zoom Groom works well on these types of cats. It’s a de-shedding tool that looks like a rubber brush.

If you have any other questions of taking care of your cat in-between grooms, as at your next visit! We’d be happy to have one of groomers come in and talk to you!

post-Julia


Still need to make your boarding reservations?

Check out our new boarding video where we walk you through what it’s like for your pet to stay with us! We offer boarding, bathing, and grooming services 7 days a week along with our excellent veterinary care!

Irvine Vet Offices: Schedule An Appointment

Find Out More About Irvine Vet Services’ Quality Pet Boarding


Orange County summers, Heatstroke and Your Cat

By Dr. Caitlin Snyder, Northpark

As we humans begin to enjoy the warmer summer weather, let’s ensure that our pets don’t succumb to the dangers of the hot summer sun!

How cats handle the heat:

  • Cats’ sweat glands are located in their paw pads, but they’re so small that this is not very effective. Their main mechanism to dissipate heat is to groom themselves. As the saliva evaporates from their skin, it cools them, much like when humans sweat. When this preferred mechanism for cooling fails, they can pant. This is an emergency situation.
  • Signs that your cat is over heated: panting, excessively grooming, sluggish, confused, bright red ears, gums, or tongue, vomiting, collapse, seizure, coma, death.

How to prevent heat stroke:

  • Change your cat’s water often. If they are housed outdoors, it should be changed as often as three times a day.
  • If possible, keep your cat indoors.
  • Provide shade.
  • Keep your cats off hot surfaces. Watch your pets for the signs that his/her feet hurt- if they’re picking up their paws, shifting their weight, they’re burning!
  • DO NOT LEAVE YOUR CAT IN THE CAR. Even with the windows open, even if your car is parked in the shade, do not leave them. Cars can turn into ovens, reaching 120 degrees within minutes.

What to do:

If you suspect heat stroke, contact a veterinarian immediately and seek medical attention. Keep your pet cool in a shady place with fans and cool water, but do not use ice water.

Dr.Snyder


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Orange County has flea season all year round! If you are worried about warding off fleas or currently seeing fleas, order your meds from our online store or stop in today! We carry most flea and tick preventatives in our practices!


 

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